State of the service

29 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    Would be nice to see a breakdown of age and gender for each substantive classification level.

    • Australian Public Service Commission (Author)

      Thanks for your comment. Detailed breakdowns of the Australian Public Service by age, gender, substantive classification level and other attributes can be found within the APS Statistical Bulletin. While the 2015-16 Bulletin should be available in mid-September, data for previous years are currently available.

      • Anonymous

        Given we are at mid-September, is there a view to having the full report Statistical Bulletin/supplementary data snapshots published soon?

      • Kristen Dixon

        The 2015-16 APS Statistical Bulletin is scheduled for release later this week. We will provide a link to the report on the State of the Service website.

  2. Anonymous

    The report provides the number of ongoing, non-ongoing, and casual etc employment, but what are the numbers/percentages for outsourced staff (FTE) working for the APS?

    • Australian Public Service Commission (Author)

      The APSC captures information for APS employees and agencies. As outsourced staff or contractors are not APS employees, they are not included in the information that the APSC captures or holds. Each agency will report details for their contacted workforce within their annual reports.

  3. Carman

    It’s great to see the APS tailoring posts in a more relaxed, user-friendly way. Infographics are such a modern and fantastic way to display information. Well done team.

  4. Anonymous

    This visual is fantastic. Easy to read and very eye catching.

  5. Anonymous

    This information does not explain how the capability and capacity of the APS contributes to meeting strategic goals and addressing the Government’s priorities. I would have expected more from a well funded APSC.

    • Australian Public Service Commission (Author)

      Thanks for the comment. This is the first of more than two dozen posts we have planned that will ultimately accompany the State of the Service Report for 2015-16. This series of future publications will address how the APS is currently contributing to meeting strategic goals and the Government’s priorities.

  6. Anonymous

    Pretty colours! Parliament is bound to love them :)

  7. Warwick

    Thanks for providing the information – it’s very interesting to read. Like one of the other commenters, I’d find the classification breakdown by age and gender to be very interesting.

    I don’t think your info-graphic style is totally successful though. Graphics are useful if they help emphasise the meaning in the numbers. However in the, “Total length of service in current agency” chart, for example, the hexagons, lines and colours don’t actually mean anything – they’re just decorative, and it’s hard to tell which label goes with each hexagon. If you had a more traditional bar chart (which could still be nicely presented) then it’d help in understanding the figures at a glance. The same applies to “Total length of service in the APS” and “Substantive classification level”.

    Thanks for providing such good alt-text on your images. It might also be worth trying the scalable vector graphics format for these sort of graphics to get them to scale better to different screen sizes.

  8. Anonymous

    Conspicuous by its absence:

    gender breakdown by substantive position

    • Australian Public Service Commission (Author)

      Thanks for taking the time to comment. Gender and classification are topics that will be addressed in future updates.

  9. Anonymous

    Are there any statistics on how many ‘people of color’ are at the EL2 and SES levels? Diversity here only seems to mean white women.

    • Australian Public Service Commission (Author)

      Thanks for your comment. Diversity within the APS will be addressed across a series of future updates.

  10. Anonymous

    It would be nice to see some text alongside these infographics. They are pretty but it’s overload!

    • Australian Public Service Commission (Author)

      Thank you for your feedback.

      This is the first of more than two dozen posts we have planned that will ultimately accompany the State of the Service Report for 2015-16, where we’ll analyse and present the data in a more detailed format.

  11. Anonymous

    Was it really necessary to conduct the census? HR can supply the figures almost by a mouse click and the 31% of non-participants affected the result anyway (?)

    • Australian Public Service Commission (Author)

      Thank you for your comment.

      The Australian Public Service Employment Database (APSED) is a database that stores the employment data of all current and former APS employees. APSED is maintained by the Australian Public Service Commission and data is supplied to APSED from the Human Resource systems of APS agencies.

      The Australian Public Service Commission has legislative responsibility to report to Parliament each year on the ‘state of the APS’. The findings of the employee census provide vital input to this report. It provides insight into employees’ views about the APS, their agency and their workplace. The census results help target strategies to build APS workplace capability now and in the future. Only using APSED data excludes any attitudinal questions that make up the majority of the census.

      This post is a high level snapshot of data that is the start of more than two dozen posts that will ultimately accompany the State of the Service Report for 2015-16. In these posts we’ll analyse and present the data in a more detailed format.

  12. Anonymous

    45% of public servants over the age of 40 seems suggests younger people are not drawn to the APS. With 30% over 50yo, it seems that a major recruitment drive may be required in coming years, and the APS will need to look a lot more inviting (or is it simply that younger workers make up the majority of those that didn’t complete the census?)

    • Kristen Dixon

      Thank you for your comment.

      The 2015-16 APS Statistical Bulletin is scheduled for release later this week, this will show HR data for all agencies and is a more accurate reflection of the demographics of the APS as a whole.

  13. Anonymous

    What I’d expected. Non-ongoing hiring practices mean employee age isn’t evenly spread.
    There are fewer 20 to 29 year olds than 50 to 54 year olds. Bodes well for new ideas and renewal.

    • Kristen Dixon

      Thank you for your comment.

      The 2015-16 APS Statistical Bulletin is scheduled for release later this week, this will show HR data for all agencies and is a more accurate reflection of the demographics of the APS as a whole.

  14. Anonymous

    Apart from age and gender breakdown for each substantive classification, would love to see the ethnic/cultural diversity at each level or the percentage of overseas born employees at each level.

    • Kristen Dixon

      Thank you for your comment.

      The 2015-2016 APS Statistical Bulletin is scheduled for release later this week. We will provide a link to the report on the State of the Service website.

  15. Anonymous

    Can confirmation be given by APSC that data provided by employees for the 2016 APS Census cannot be identified. Staff have provided this information on the understanding that they cannot be identified. Can you please provide reassurance that any data already provided from the Census does not have identifiers linked to it

    • Australian Public Service Commission (Author)

      On 26 August 2016, as in previous years, the APSC published a cleansed version of the APS employee census dataset on data.gov.au.

      Respondents to the census were informed, as part of the questionnaire, that data would be made available on this platform.

      This year the APSC introduced a unique numeric code against individual agencies data on the dataset. Agency names were not identified.

      A concern was raised that the agency identifier made it possible for data users to attempt to identify individual employees’ responses.

      After further consideration, we have removed this identifier. We have also asked the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet to thoroughly test any data before it is reloaded onto data.gov.au.

      The APSC undertakes significant data cleaning and checking measures to protect the anonymity of individual respondents before publishing census data on data.gov.au. The census is also designed so that individual respondents cannot be linked to other data sources with certainty.

      I assure you that no personal information was published in the public domain.

      Ensuring the privacy of individual employees is our main concern. It is important that employees have confidence that their responses remain confidential so that participation in the APS employee census remains high.

      If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us on 1800 464 926 or stateoftheservice@apsc.gov.au.