State of the service

APS representation of people with disability

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The APS should represent the community it serves. The APS works to identify and remove any workplace barriers impacting employees’ efforts to achieve their full potential. Reasonable workplace adjustments for employees with disability can maximise participation and contribution in the workplace. Over the last two years there has been a small increase in the percentage of ongoing APS employees with disability. This increase, from 3.2% in 2013 to 3.5% in 2015, has followed a decade long decline.

Figure 1.

Ongoing employees reporting disability

Paper icon representing the learn more page Learn more about this chart: view data and full question set for Figure 1.

Per cent

Employees reporting disability

June

Figure 1. is a line chart showing the representation of Ongoing APS employees with disability from 2001 to 2015. In 2004 (4.2%) to 2013 (3.2%) representation steadily decreased. In 2014 (3.4%) and 2015 (3.5%) representation has increased slightly.

The principles of employment are the same for people with disability as those without disability. The main focus is on the skills, talents and capabilities a person with disability brings to the workplace. The employment of people with disability can also bring new insights and perspectives to an agency. Being inclusive is important for individual agencies as well as the broader APS. An employee base that includes people with disability provides the APS with different perspectives that can help deliver more effective services to citizens. It also increases the likelihood of identifying unmet needs and challenging traditional processes and practices.

  • “Over half of all APS agencies have an SES champion for employees with disability”

Although there is a mandate for the collection of HR data in respect of employees with disability, it is likely the actual proportion of people with disability in the APS is under-represented in the current data.

APS agencies continue to develop workplace cultures that support and empower individuals with disability. More than 50% of agencies have an SES sponsor to act as a senior level champion for employees with disability. This year over 40% of agencies reported having a formal whole-of-agency strategy in place to support the employment of people with disability.

Over a quarter of APS employees with disability are employed at the APS 4 classification and over one fifth at the APS 6 classification. The proportion of employees with disability declines steadily at the EL and SES classifications.

Figure 2.

Ongoing employees reporting disability by classification

Paper icon representing the learn more page Learn more about this chart: view data and full question set for Figure 2.

Per cent


Ongoing employees reporting disability by classification

Classification

Figure 2. is a bar chart showing ongoing employees: disability status by classification. The majority of APS employees with disability are employed at the APS 4 classification (26.2%) and the APS 6 classification (21%). The proportion of employees with disability declines steadily at the EL classification (EL 1 15% compared to the rest of the APS at 18.4%. EL 2 6.4% compared to the rest of the APS at 8.2%) and SES level (1.3% compared to the rest of the APS at 1.8%).

Employees with disability have an older age profile when compared to the rest of the APS. They represent over 20% of employees in the 50-54 age group. The average age of APS employees with disability is 47.2 years. The average age of the rest of the APS is 43.4 years. Given the challenges posed by an ageing population and the increased competition for talent, the APS needs to ensure that workforce management strategies support the contribution and retention of people with disability in the workplace.

Figure 3.

Ongoing employees reporting disability by age group

Paper icon representing the learn more page Learn more about this chart: view data and full question set for Figure 3.

Per cent

Ongoing employees reporting disability by age group

Age (years)

Figure 3. is a bar chart showing ongoing employees: disability status by age group. Employees with disability have an older age profile when compared to the rest of the APS. They represent over 21.4% of employees in the 50-54 age group compared to the rest of the APS (15.3%).

Employees with disability generally have a greater length of service compared to the rest of the APS. At 30 June 2015, the average length of service for employees with disability was 16 years, compared to 12.7 years for the rest of the APS.

Figure 4.

Ongoing employees reporting disability by length of service

Paper icon representing the learn more page Learn more about this chart: view data and full question set for Figure 4.

Per cent

Ongoing employees reporting disability by length of service

Length of Service (years)

Figure 4. is a bar chart showing Employees with disability generally have a greater length of service compared to the rest of the APS. Employees with disability with 20 to less than 30 years of service have greater representation than the rest of the APS (21.4% compared to 13.4%).

Employee engagement for people with disability has improved since 2012. Although the 2015 results for job and team engagement are slightly lower than last year, the drop is not significant. Similar to results previously discussed for all APS employees (APS employee engagement post), employee engagement for people with disability has remained relatively stable over recent years.

Figure 5.

Employee engagement—all employees reporting disability

Paper icon representing the learn more page Learn more about this chart: view data and full question set for Figure 5.

Employee engagement index

Figure 5. is a bar chart showing that the engagement levels of employees with disability have improved slightly between 2012 and 2015. Engagement is highest at the supervisor level (range of 6.29 to 6.84)and lowest at the agency level (range of 5.13 to 5.32).

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Read the State of the Service Report 2014–15 on the APSC website.